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Trojan-Horse

Type: Article

Executive Summary

What are we to learn from the above? If we are wise, it will be this:

  1. There are individuals and organisations in Britain who seek much greater accommodation of, and adherence to, Islamic norms in our society

  2. Efforts to subversively introduce Islamic norms and practices to British schools have already been undertaken, and been successful

  3. The accommodation of Islamic norms etc. in British society will inevitably mean a loss of democratic free speech and an erosion of the rights and protections of women and girls

  4. The British public sector is shaped by state demands for tolerance, inclusion, multiculturalism and diversity. These are of the utmost importance in the mind of the state

  5. Many British teachers, including the profession’s largest union, have expressed anti-Western and anti-British sentiment and openly support the concept of multiculturalism

  6. Activist groups who seek the Islamisation of British schools, use the language of multiculturalism and diversity to advance their arguments and in doing so, successfully sanitise and legitimise notions that are wholly in opposition to the values of British society

The fact of the matter is that there is an ideological aim to Islamise Britain and the British state is lending a helping hand. In its consistent prioritising of “diversity”, the Government has ignored the detail and has little understanding of what this idea means in every day life. The British Government has effectively decided that religion is good, regardless of what it teaches.

If this problem is to be fixed, a complete political and cultural shift is required in Britain. Schools must return to teaching literacy, numeracy, the sciences, as priority, and teachers’ political leanings should have no bearing in the classroom. It is right that pupils learn about religion, but in the interests of truth, it cannot be that they learn a sanitised or moderated version that can be constructed and approved by those with their own agenda.

Teachers should be required to teach the values of Britain to children (to which we need to add equal rights between genders as a matter of urgency), regardless of their feelings, and to teach accurate history and current affairs. If Israel-Palestine is discussed, then the charter of Hamas should be included, as well as the genocidal intent of global jihadis against the Jewish state.

Furthermore, children should be reminded that they are British, and all of the positive things that this entails.

Most importantly, Government must move away from the notion that all religions are a force for good, and look instead at what is actually being taught. Government must be honest and open and when it sees problems developing, look at the facts without colouring them with multicultural dogma.

Parents have a right to know the culture in which their children are being schooled, and we all have a right to know how the minds of future generations are being formed. At present, they are being schooled in multiculturalism, unquestioning respect for all minority groups irrespective of their practices, and something close to disdain for their own history, identity and heritage.

British schools have numerous problems, but their utilisation as an advancement of jihadi ideology is a problem for us all.

Ofsted, the organisation charged with monitoring standards in British schools, has produced a report revealing disturbing messages being taught to children by Islamists in secular state institutions.

It is poetic justice that the “plan” which kick-started recent events in the British school system-and now proclaimed to be a “hoax”—both fits the description of the investigative findings, and is in line with long-held Islamic doctrines involving the establishment and progressive self-segregation of the Muslim “Ummah” within non-Muslim countries.

Type: News

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
02/11/2017
Summary: 

The invite seemed innocuous. Tomorrow evening, at a community centre in Birmingham, parents, teachers and others would gather to discuss the future of schools in Britain’s second city. One pictures a scene from David Cameron’s Big Society: local people pulling together with experts to improve the education of their children. Sadly, the meeting was no such thing.

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
28/02/2017
Summary: 

One parent governor, the Sunday Times reported, held "Islamic teaching sessions" on schools premises and his wife "made remarks to Asian staff members that they should, as Muslim women, be wearing a veil and covering their heads." The couple campaigned against "lewd and inappropriate activities" such as sex education. The governor, Nasim Ashraf, is also accused of trying to "intimidate school staff" and change the school to "reflect their interpretation of Islam". There was an "organised effort" to "change the ethos of the school", according to one source with what the Sunday T

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
20/02/2017
Summary: 

Counter-terror police are investigating a new alleged Islamist “Trojan Horse” plot to control a state school, with claims the head teacher was attacked and intimidated by Muslim parents, including a threat to blow up her car. Almost all the students at Clarksfield Primary School in Oldham are of Pakistani Muslim heritage, and some parents are said to have ordered female teachers to cover their heads. One governor, whose sibling is a convicted terrorist, hosted “Islamic teaching sessions” at the school.

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
19/02/2017
Summary: 

When Trish O’Donnell took the headship of Clarksfield Primary School — a vast Edwardian building rising amid the rooftops of east Oldham — one council officer told her that she had inherited the town’s “poisoned chalice”. That was, if anything, an understatement.

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
19/02/2017
Summary: 

Operation Trojan Horse, a plot by Islamic extremists to take over state schools in Birmingham, was exposed by a Sunday Times investigation in 2014. A plan compiled by Salafist Muslims was leaked to Birmingham city council, detailing a strategy to remove unwanted head teachers and “parachute in” Muslim governors.

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
28/11/2016
Summary: 

Two ringleaders within the Trojan Horse plot to impose Islamic values on Birmingham state schools are once again teaching, despite being banned from the profession. Both Tahir Alam and Razwan Faraz are running informal classes, The Sunday Times has reported – Faraz under a false name in a different city. An official report into the Trojan Horse scandal found that both Alam and Faraz were instrument

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
23/11/2016
Summary: 

The “Trojan Horse” school scandal was the transformation of state schools in Britain into de facto Islamic schools. Rasheed Benyahia’s mother was governor of a group of schools at the center of the scandal. She now claims that “the case might have been used by extremists to turn him against Britain.” Even among a group known for its victimhood posturing, this really takes the cake.

Country: 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (the)
News Date: 
14/10/2016
Summary: 

Two teachers served with lifetime bans for plotting to illegally Islamise a school in Birmingham have been allowed back into the profession because of a technical irregularity and alleged “unfairness”.

Type: Opinion

Summary: 

I think the battle we must fight now really has very little to do with sincere religious belief. It’s about social control, repression, misogyny and cruelty. The battle is about Kamaljit, a 14-year-old girl I once taught, who chided me when I read the class a story about snakes in India, like the good, clueless multiculturalist that I was. “Please, Miss, we don’t like that stuff,” she said. “We’re English. We like ice skating.”

We have to expose Muslim children to as wide a range of experiences as possible so they will feel the gravitational pull of British values. If a Devon primary school recently criticised by Ofsted for not being multicultural enough (yes, really) can arrange a horizon-broadening trip to the inner city, then surely it’s time that Birmingham and Bradford came to Hereford and Hampshire. It was Rodgers and Hammerstein who observed in South Pacific: “You’ve got to be taught to hate and fear / You’ve got to be taught from year to year / It’s got to be drummed in your dear little ear / You’ve got to be carefully taught. / You’ve got to be taught before it’s too late / Before you are six or seven or eight / To hate all the people your relatives hate / You’ve got to be carefully taught.”

Type: Publication

Author(s):

Summary: 

11 Conclusions

11.1 I neither specifically looked for, nor found, evidence of terrorism, radicalisation or violent extremism in the schools of concern in Birmingham. However, by reference to the definition of extremism in the Prevent strand of the Government’s counter terrorist strategy CONTEST, and the spectrum of extremism described by the Prime Minister in his Munich speech in February 2011, I found clear evidence that there are a number of people, associated with each other and in positions of influence in schools and governing bodies, who espouse, sympathise with or fail to challenge extremist views. Three are named in this report but there are others of significance who are not.

11.2 The existence of a common ideological stance among key linked individuals in this enquiry, the taking of control of governing bodies and the implementation of conservative religious practices in the schools where these individuals have influence, means that there can be no doubt that what has happened has been driven by a desire to instil a particular style of religious ethos into these state non-faith schools.

11.3 It has been suggested to me that the ambition of those who were involved was to do no more than create schools that are reflective of the communities they serve and are following the wishes of the majority of parents. I find that this is not the case. On the contrary, while the majority of parents welcome the good academic results that some of these schools produce, they are not demanding that their children adhere to conservative religious behaviour at school. On the contrary, I received evidence that it is a minority of parents who want this to happen. I have been told by many witnesses, however, that most parents do not have the confidence to argue against the articulate and forceful people who seek their imposition, for fear of being branded as disloyal to their faith or their community. 11.4 I have received evidence from witnesses who express three key concerns about the impact on children of what has happened. First, I have been told by teachers that they fear children are learning to be intolerant of difference and diversity. Second, although good academic results can be achieved through a narrowing of the curriculum, it comes at a cost. The cost is that young people, instead of enjoying a broadening and enriching experience in school, are having their horizons narrowed. They are not being prepared properly to flourish in the inevitably diverse environments of further education, the workplace or life outside predominantly Muslim communities. They are thus being potentially denied the opportunity to prosper in a modern multi-cultural Britain. Third, the very clear evidence that young people are being encouraged to adopt an unquestioning attitude to a particular hardline strand of Sunni Islam raises real concerns about their vulnerability to radicalisation in the future. I have heard evidence to the effect that there are real fears that their current experiences will make it harder for them to question or challenge radical influences. 11.5 At the centre of what has happened are a number of individuals who have been, or are, associated with either Park View School or the Park View Educational Trust. Time and again, people who have been either teachers or governors at Park View, appear to be involved in behaviours at other schools that have destabilised headteachers, sometimes leading to their resignation or removal. The tactics that have been used are too similar , the individuals concerned too closely linked and the behaviour of a few parents and governors too orchestrated for there not to be a degree of co-ordination and organisation behind what has happened. The clear conclusion is that Park View Educational Trust has, in reality, become the incubator for much of what has happened and the attitudes and behaviours that have driven it. 11.6 I have considered the totality of the evidence gathered during the investigation very carefully, and been careful to avoid the temptation to draw undue inferences from an evidence base that is inevitably incomplete, given the urgent need to establish what has happened in schools so that stability can be restored and children safeguarded. The accumulation of evidence from my own investigation, information received from Birmingham City Council, Ofsted, the Education Funding Agency and numerous other sources lead me to the following conclusion.

11.7 There has been co-ordinated, deliberate and sustained action, carried out by a number of associated individuals, to introduce an intolerant and aggressive Islamic ethos into a few schools in Birmingham. This has been achieved in a number of schools through gaining influence on the governing bodies, installing sympathetic headteachers or senior members of staff, appointing like minded people to key positions, and seeking to remove headteachers who they do not feel to be sufficiently compliant with their agenda. Their motivation may well be linked to a deeply held religious conviction, but the effect has been to limit the life chances of the young people in their care and to render them more vulnerable to pernicious influences in the future.

11.8 Birmingham City Council was aware of the practices and behaviours that were subsequently outlined in the ‘Trojan Horse’ letter long before the letter surfaced. Officers have conceded that it did not consider carefully enough nor soon enough the question of whether there was a pattern in what was happening across a number of schools. Instead, the Council persisted in approaching incidents on a case-by-case basis. Further, the officers looking at the issue from a community cohesion and education management perspective respectively did not appear to be sufficiently joined up.

11.9 The Council has not supported headteachers faced with aggressive and inappropriate governor behaviour. This has led to the perception that the Council has relied too readily on the solution of a compromise agreement and that it has failed in its duty of care towards their employees. The Council not being proactive enough in confronting the type of governor practice described in preceding chapters has led to a perception that it has ‘appeased’ governors.

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